“THE GOLD MACHINE BEATS: A JUNGLE DEATH PHOTO ALBUM” – chapbook by Beat Scene

A chapbook by Kevin Ring has just been published: THE GOLD MACHINE BEATS: A JUNGLE DEATH PHOTO ALBUM, an edition of 125 copies all signed by Iain.

The chapbook is £8.50 including post in the UK.

15 Euros to Europe and $20 USA and rest of the world.

If interested, email Kevin at kevbeatscene (at) gmail.com

Go to this page and scroll down, you’ll find it.

 

 

 

 

 

Cite Scout for the Territory – an interview with Jeff Johnson

Announcement of the upcoming chapbook by Jeff Johnson:

CITE SCOUT FOR THE TERRITORY: An Interview about an in-progress bibliography of the works of Iain Sinclair.

It is No 46 in the Beat Scene series. 125 numbered copies. 8″x5″ size in the usual format.

Out in a few days.

Copies are £7.95 in the UK. Europe is £8.95 and anywhere else is $20. Includes post.

To buy:
1) UK cheque payable to M.Ring
2) by Paypal to   kev(at)beatscene.freeserve.co.uk
3)US cheque to a USA address (contact Kevin for more details)

 

Cite Scout cover

“The book I would really like to see would be Iain Sinclair’s account of walking through today’s Lower East Side.”

Back in February, Iain sent me this snippet from a blog on Burrough. He received it from Kevin Ring. It’s about William Burroughs, the locations of the Beat Generations and a found memorabilia.

“But back to the reality of City Lights in time and space. There might not be much to gather from the City Lights Bookstore address, but the phone number is interesting. The seven digit, all-numerical phone number was implemented across the United States in 1968. So 1967 is in doubt. The address for the City Lights Publishing House, 1562 Grant Avenue, narrows the possibilities even further. The book I wish I had when I was in San Francisco is Bill Morgan’s The Beat Generation in San Francisco. Along with Beat Generation in New York: A Walking Tour of Jack Kerouac’s City, it is a great travel guide and an indispensible Beat history book all in one. I find myself coming back to these two books often when researching Beat addresses and landmarks. I suspect Morgan’sBeat Altas: A State by State Guide to the Beat  is essential as well. Morgan as the Beat Livy. Can Morgan’s account of the Beat conquest of the world be far behind? (The book I would really like to see would be Iain Sinclair’s account of walking through today’s Lower East Side. What he could do with the current landscape of the city with his intimate knowledge of this location’s secret history would be astounding.). ”

Full article.