The Falconer on Vimeo

The Falconer, technically, was an advance on The Cardinal and the Corpse. This time there was no industry crew. The shoot was very much free form, going off wherever the story took us, fuelled on cultural appropriation (in the best sense) and creative paranoia. It was always intended as part of a wider project known as ‘The Perimeter Fence’, a recalibration of lives and productions lost in the margins. An alternative (and electively unreliable) series of histories, rewritten and subverted to aim at a higher truth. The progress of the film was scored by a complex network of (provoked) creative tensions: between the ostensible director Chris Petit, for example, and the former director (and self-proclaimed shaman, conman, story-teller, falconer) Peter Whitehead, between the scrupulous editor Emma Matthews and the artist/animator Dave McKean (whose brilliant inserts and interventions were microfilms on their own). As the production evolved, it was taken over by the presence of Whitehead, who always held out one more story to tell, one more startling revelation. Revelations backed up by a buried archive of feature films, documentaries and home-movie footage.
Channel 4, back in the day, responded positively. The Falconer was singled out as a new way of working: distressed and ‘painterly’ textures, hints at conspiracies, basic equipment, no crew to eat up budget. The consequence was more commissions to operate in this way – but not for us, for younger, less bothersome and cheaper hopefuls.
Dr Michael Hrebeniak said: ‘The Falconer is probably the most talked about film ever made among the psychogeography crowd… Maybe we should keep it a secret?’
Not any more.

London Orbital posted on Vimeo.

In many ways this was the easiest ‘sell’ of the group. The book of the same title, written in parallel with the film, could be described in a single sentence: ‘A walk around London’s orbital motorway.’ London Orbital was the only one released (by Illuminations) as a DVD. It offered itself to academic usage and it fitted quite comfortably within the emerging discipline (or brand) of psychography. The narrative was about endless, the slow-cinema of pedestrianism, noticing everything, and the reverie and drift of driving without stopping.  The only exits being into 19th-century fantasy and horror.  The two Thames crossings, east and west, had their pull: Bram Stoker in Purfleet and JG Ballard in Shepperton. The DVD as a package had several advantages, as Chris Petit pointed out. One of the extra features covered the A13 exhibition at the Wapping Pumping Station – and exhibits that linked exploration of the Thames Estuary, its container dumps and landfill, with my great-grandfather’s surveys of an Amazonian tributary. It’s obvious now that my recent book, The Gold Machine, was germinating, like everything else, around the fringes of London. As I state in the book: “The jungle begins in London.”
 

The Unofficial Countryside by Richard Mabey inspires video produced by Streetwise Opera

From The Londonist:

Streetwise Opera provides creative opportunities for homeless and formerly homeless people. They recently took inspiration from The Unofficial Countryside by Richard Mabey, a book from the 1970s celebrating nature breaking through in unexpected places (read Iain Sinclair’s reappraisal), gave workshop members cameras and told them to go out and capture overlooked spots of green. The result is this rather beautiful and delicate film documenting unloved parts of the city, made lovely.”

Iain Sinclair at South of the River symposium: University of Greenwich, 27th April 2012 (video)

Video footage of Greenwich symposium…

Iain

Videos of other participant to the symposium:

Allen Fisher http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9uCiOsslUF0

D S Marriott http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3pbRCQ4wpfQ

Jeff Hilson (1) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bEcoRMncLYc

Jeff Hilson (2) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gpXc6Pl2UrI

Carol Watts http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QVIFHx4V-qk

Talk on Charles Olson (Oct 15) in Gloucester, Mass. USA, at the Cape Ann Museum

Saturday, October 15,  3:00 p.m. 
Link: http://www.capeannhistoricalmuseum.org/special/exhibits.htm

Saturday, October 15, 3:00 p.m.

Iain Sinclair: Charles Olson and his influence on

British poets of the Sixties and Seventies

British author Iain Sinclair will consider the work and legend of poet Charles Olson and his influence on British poets such as JH Prynne, Tom Raworth, Andrew Crozier and Allen Fisher. This program is presented in collaboration with

The Gloucester Writers Center and The Charles Olson Society.

The program is free and open to the public. Reservations required.

Location:

The Cape Ann Museum is located at 27 Pleasant Street in downtown Gloucester, Massachusetts, America’s oldest fishing port.

Pls note that time is local to the venue

23/10/2011

Now available video of the event in 4 parts: