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The sacristan’s blog

“Personally, I do not find Iain Sinclair’s books reader friendly. […]. But this does not mean that I do not love them.”

I found this blog post by way of a email with a subject of “Those Camden Days” and a just a link to the blog in the body.

Read here: http://sacristanscript.blogspot.co.uk/2016/10/iain-sinclair.html

 

 

Walk London site by TFL

I don’t know if it has been launched, relaunched, revamped or I am just very late to it, but I received  an email from TFL about this site which features informations and maps to walk in London, including some walks which remind of some of Iain’s most impressive expeditions.

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THE SUSPENSION OF DISBELIEF BY MEANS OF A COMMON SENSE by Andrew Kötting

From our friends at Post-Nearly Press a new book by Andrew Kötting

AVAILABLE NOW

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Far-reaching and affecting conversation covering Andrew’s work, methods, inspirations and outlook. Useful and engaging background on Andrew’s working relationship with Iain Sinclair.

54 pages of original content; stab-stapled; straw, snow and granite textured paper; colour cover; inner content double sided; trimmed short of A4. Original cover by Craig Turnbull.

Limited edition; print-only. If you would like to order, please email postnearlypress@gmail.com(or just go straight on to a paypal transaction as described below).

UK: paypal GBP 8.00 to postnearlypress@gmail.com (includes postage)

Elsewhere: please email postnearlypress@gmail.com for postage costs

Alternative payments, cheque etc, all fine: please email to arrange.

Iain Sinclair on why you should support Housmans

A post by Iain about his gig at the University of Kent and poetry

“In my strange new life as visitor or cultural goad at the University of Kent in Canterbury, I have been reintroduced to poetry as a live concern. And asked to explain why I called it a ‘secret’ part of my practice. There was only one student poet signed up for the initial seminar, but a solid smattering of veterans around my own age, keen on the gossip. And then, that first evening, I had a good time interacting with musicians, down in the town at a gig called Free Range (with reason). It was assumed by all the folk I met that I’d published no poetry after the final Albion Village Press book, Suicide Bridge, in 1979. This is not quite the case. Indeed, Suicide Bridge has been brought back by Skylight Press with a bunch of new material, books of the West and North that never made it into the original version. I think Skylight shifted around six copies last year. Nicholas Johnson, promoter of the excellent and upcoming Black Huts Festival in Hastings, brought out a big collection of mine, Firewall, in 2006. With all the ‘secret’ books and elective obscurities from 1979-2006. And an introduction by Michael McClure. So here is the news for Canterbury: secrets are just things you don’t want to find.”