Support this website. Thanks!

Archives

Iain Sinclair and Will Self: Walking London at the Victoria and Albert Museum

  • When:  –
  • Where: The Lydia & Manfred Gorvy Lecture Theatre

EVENING EVENT: Iain Sinclair and Will Self are two of the most important contemporary writers on London.

Their books, like Sinclair’s Lud Heat, and Downriver, and Self’s Dorian and Umbrella explore the darker, haunting aspects of the city. They are also both inveterate walkers and have traversed much of London on foot. They discuss their enduring fascination with the capital and what it means for their work.

18.30 – 19.30

ÂŁ10, ÂŁ7 concessions

In collaboration with London: Medieval to Modern, new V&A year course

Friday 18 September

Source: Iain Sinclair and Will Self: Walking London | What’s On | Victoria and Albert Museum


BLACKWELL’S OXFORD PRESENTS: Iain Sinclair in conversation with Brian Catling

  • BLACKWELL’S OXFORD PRESENTS: Iain Sinclair in conversation with Brian Catling

    Tuesday, July 14th at 19:00 – 20:00

    Two very different books, Iain Sinclair’s Black Apples of Gower and Brian Catling’s The Vorrhshare a measure of common ground: The Cave of origin (in which all narratives fester and cook)Sinclair tramps the wave-cut limestone pavements beyond Port Eynon Point in search of mysteries derived from the paintings of Ceri Richards, where Catling plunges headlong into myths of primal forest, for a novel described by Alan Moore as ‘a benchmark for the human imagination’.The two writers will be discussing the common thread that links two very different works of literature.Tickets ÂŁ3 Tel: 01865 333623 events.oxford@blackwell.co.uk

Iain Sinclair and Brian Catling at the London Review Bookshop

Iain Sinclair and Brian Catling: Black Apple of the Vorrh

Source: London Review Bookshop | Events | Iain Sinclair and Brian Catling: Black Apple of the Vorrh

 

Two very different books, Iain Sinclair’s Black Apples of Gower and Brian Catling’s The Vorrh share a measure of common ground: the Cave of Origin (in which all narratives fester and cook). Sinclair tramps the wave-cut limestone pavements beyond Port Eynon Point in search of mysteries derived from the paintings of Ceri Richards, where Catling plunges headlong into myths of the primal forest, for a novel described by Alan Moore as ‘a benchmark for the human imagination’. The two writers come together for a visit to Nuneham House, where the Rev. Buckland is purported to have devoured the most celebrated relic, the preserved heart of Louis XIV.

Iain Sinclair: Overground & Underworld / Reading + Q&A /

EVENTS &
EXHIBITIONS

We are delighted to announce that writer and film-maker Iain Sinclair will be appearing at the shop on Wednesday 8 July at 7 pm to read and talk about two new books: London Overground: A Day’s Walk around the Ginger Line (Hamish Hamilton) and Black Apples of Gower (Little Toller Books). Tickets are ÂŁ3. For booking please call 020 7241 1626

or email: books@broadwaybookshophackney.com.

Please see below listing for full event details.

……………………………………………………………………………

……………………………………………………………………………

 

IAIN SINCLAIR:

OVERGROUND & UNDERWORLD

Reading + Q&A

Wednesday 8 July at 7 p.m.

 

Iain Sinclair will be appearing at the shop to read and talk about two new books – London Overground and Black Apples of Gower – that together explore opposing territories: the overground of London’s orbital railway, and the underworld of the Gower Peninsula. Signed copies of both books will be available to buy, as well as a large selection of Iain’s other writings. Tickets are ÂŁ3 (includes a glass of wine). Places are limited: we recommend booking in advance on: 020 7241 1626 or email: books@broadwaybookshophackney.com.

About London Overground:

(from the publisher)

The completion of the full circle of the London Overground in December 2012 provides Iain Sinclair with a new path to walk the shifting territory of the capital.

With thirty-three stations and thirty-five miles to tramp – plus inevitable and unforeseen detours and false steps – Sinclair embarks on a marathon circumnavigation at street level, tracking the necklace of garages, fish farms, bakeries, convenience cafes, cycle repair shops and Minder lock-ups which enclose inner London.

Here he encounters traces of writers gone or nearly forgotten, uncovers evidence of careless erasures and incongruous overlappings, follows signs of decay hijacked by official rejuvenation and generally slips between the cracks of the approved and over-capitalized.

 

About Black Apples of Gower:

(from the publisher)

 

Iain Sinclair walks back along the blue-grey roads and the cliff-top paths of his childhood in south Wales, rediscovering the Gower Peninsula, a place first explored in his youth. Provoked by the strange, enigmatic series of paintings, Afal du Brogwyr (Black Apple of Gower), made by the artist Ceri Richards in the 1950s, Sinclair leaves behind the familiar, ‘murky elsewheres’ of his life in Hackney, carrying an envelope

of black-and-white photographs and old postcards, along with fragments of memory that neither confirm nor deny whether he belongs here, amongst the wave-cut limestone, the car parks and the Gower 

bungalows. 

But digging and sifting, he soon recognises that a series of walks over the same ground – Port Eynon Point to Worm’s Head – have become significant waymarks in his life, and his recollections of a meeting with the poet of place, Vernon Watkins, is an opening into the legends of the rocks and the mythology behind the Black Apples of Ceri Richards and the poems of Dylan Thomas.

Under cliff, along limestone shores, Sinclair comes to realise that the defining quest must be to the Paviland Cave, where in 1823 the Reverend William Buckland found human bones put to ground 36,000 years ago. All the threads of this story lead underground, through this potent and still mysterious cavern, to the site of the first recorded ritual burial in these islands.

……………………………………………………………………………

Iain Sinclair’s books include London Orbital, Hackney, That Rose-Red Empire, Downriver (which won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize and the Encore Award) Ghost Milk and American Smoke. He lives in Hackney, East London.

For further information please visit:

www.broadwaybookshophackney.com

……………………………………………………………………………

Iain event organised by Pages of Hackney

Source: Events

Mark Pilkington talks to Iain about his two latest books, Black Apples of Gower and London Overground: A Day’s Walk Around the Ginger Line

Tuesday 7th July, 7pm
Sutton House
2-4 Homerton High Street
E9 6JQ

Black Apples of Gower
Iain walks back along the blue-grey roads and the cliff-top paths of his childhood in south Wales, rediscovering the Gower Peninsula, a place first explored in his youth. Provoked by the strange, enigmatic series of paintings, Afal du Brogwyr (Black Apple of Gower), made by the artist Ceri Richards in the 1950s, Sinclair leaves behind the familiar, ‘murky elsewheres’ of his life in Hackney, carrying an envelope of black-and-white photographs and old postcards, along with fragments of memory that neither confirm nor deny whether he belongs here, amongst the wave-cut limestone, the car parks and the Gower bungalows. But digging and sifting, he soon recognises that a series of walks over the same ground – Port Eynon Point to Worm’s Head – have become significant waymarks in his life, and his recollections of a meeting with the poet of place, Vernon Watkins, is an opening into the legends of the rocks and the mythology behind the Black Apples of Ceri Richards and the poems of Dylan Thomas. Under cliff, along limestone shores, Sinclair comes to realise that the defining quest must be to the Paviland Cave, where in 1823 the Reverend William Buckland found human bones put to ground 36,000 years ago. All the threads of this story lead underground, through this potent and still mysterious cavern, to the site of the first recorded ritual burial in these islands.

London Overground: A Day’s Walk Around the Ginger Line
Echoing his journey in London Orbital over a decade ago, Iain narrates his second circular walk around the capital. Shortly after rush-hour and accompanied by a rambling companion, Sinclair begins walking along London’s Overground network, or, ‘Ginger Line’. With characteristic playfulness, detours into folk history, withering assessments of the political classes and a joyful allegiance to the ordinary oddball, Sinclair guides us on a tour of London’s trendiest new transport network – and shows the shifting, changing city from new and surprising angles.

Iain Sinclair’s books include London Orbital, Hackney: That Rose-Red Empire, Downriver (which won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize and the Encore Award) Ghost Milk and American Smoke. He is the editor of the anthology London: City of Disappearances and has also written and presented a number of films for BBC2’s Late Show, collaborated with Andrew Kötting on Swandown and By Our Selves, and co-directed several documentaries with Chris Petit, including London Orbitaland The Falconer. He was born in South Wales, went to school in England and university in Ireland, and now lives in Hackney, East London.

Mark Pilkington is the author of Mirage Men and Far Out: 101 Strange Tales from Science’s Outer Edge. He is also head of Strange Attractor Press, a publishing imprint which has been championing underground and outsider culture for over ten years.

 

Black Apples of the Gower by Iain Sinclair: a video

“The book I didn’t know I was going to write” Iain Sinclair on the Black Apples of Gower from Little Toller Books on Vimeo.

Source: Black Apples of the Gower by Iain Sinclair
IAIN SINCLAIR walks back along the blue-grey roads and the cliff-top paths of his childhood in south Wales, rediscovering the Gower Peninsula, a place first explored in his youth. Provoked by the strange, enigmatic series of paintings, Afal du Brogwyr (Black Apple of Gower), made by the artist Ceri Richards in the 1950s, Sinclair leaves behind the familiar, ‘murky elsewheres’ of his life in Hackney, carrying an envelope of black-and-white photographs and old postcards, along with fragments of memory that neither confirm nor deny whether he belongs here, amongst the wave-cut limestone, the car parks and the Gower bungalows.But digging and sifting, he soon recognises that a series of walks over the same ground – Port Eynon Point to Worm’s Head – have become significant waymarks in his life, and his recollections of a meeting with the poet of place, Vernon Watkins, is an opening into the legends of the rocks and the mythology behind the Black Apples of Ceri Richards and the poems of Dylan Thomas. Under cliff, along limestone shores, Sinclair comes to realise that the defining quest must be to the Paviland Cave, where in 1823 the Reverend William Buckland found human bones put to ground 36,000 years ago. All the threads of this story lead underground, through this potent and still mysterious cavern, to the site of the first recorded ritual burial in these islands.

LONDON EVENTS

July 2015

2nd July – Waterstones Piccadilly with Brian Catling and Gareth Evans – 7.00pm

7th July – Pages of Hackney @ Sutton House – 7.00pm – Mark Pilkington as Chair

8th July – Broadway Books – 7.00pm

9th July – London Review Bookshop (LRB) with Brian Catling – 7.00pm

14th July – Blackwell’s Oxford with Brian Catling – 6.30pm

27nd July – Stanford’s  London – 6.30pm

 

BLACK APPLE RADIO

With Iain Sinclair

Iain Sinclair will be talking about Black Apples of Gower on BBC Radio 4’s Midweek alongside children’s writer Julia Donaldson – 8th July Listen here

Black Apples of Gower – Iain Sinclair returns to his Welsh roots. Listen here