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32 Londoners on the London Eye – Nicholas Hawksmoor with Iain Sinclair

Source: 32 Londoners on the London Eye – Nicholas Hawksmoor

NICHOLAS HAWKSMOOR
Nicholas Hawksmoor was an English architect and leading figure of the English Baroque style in the late 17th and early 18th centuries. He was born to a yeoman family in Nottinghamshire and developed a fascination for architecture early on. While a teenager, he travelled to London where he trained under the master of the time, Christopher Wren. Unlike his contemporaries, such as James Gibbs and Thomas Archer, he never travelled abroad to be influenced by Italianate fashions – his Roman classical style was gained entirely through the study of books. He went on to design some of the most notable and outstanding buildings of the period, including parts of Westminster Abbey and seven extraordinary City churches after the Great Fire.


The Vorrh by B Catling review – ‘one of the most original works of visionary fiction since Mervyn Peake’ | Books | The Guardian

A sentient forest older than mankind is the setting for an extraordinary fantasy

Source: The Vorrh by B Catling review – ‘one of the most original works of visionary fiction since Mervyn Peake’ | Books | The Guardian

“By Our Selves” at the Hackney Picture House – special screening + Q&A

BY OUR SELVES POSTER 4 SMALL TEXT copy

UK premiere of Andrew Kötting’s film By Our Selves, which retraces English poet John Clare’s journey from Epping Forest to Northamptonshire. Toby Jones, Iain Sinclair and a Straw Bear follow in Clare’s footsteps exactly 150 years after his death. En route they bump into Macgillivray, Dr Simon Kovesi and the wizard Alan Moore. Meantime the journey is narrated by Toby’s father Freddie, a maverick actor who featured in numerous David Lynch films. An epic march through hunger and madness, By Our Selves is an English journey to set beside ‘A Pilgrim’s Progress’. Following the screening, there will be a Q&A with Andrew Kotting, Iain Sinclair, Alan Moore and Toby Jones, hosted by Gareth Evans.

CONDUCTORS OF CHAOS

*PLEASE NOTE THAT IAIN IS NOT APPEARING AT THIS EVENT*

We examine the work of the poetry outsiders gathered in Conductors of Chaos (Picador).

Last year saw the announcement of the 2014 Next Generation Poets, 20 poets promoted as the ones ‘expected to dominate the poetry landscape of the coming decade’.

In 1996, partly in response to the 1994 New Generation Poets initiative, Iain Sinclair edited his groundbreaking anthology, collecting together the work of poets ‘submerged’ in the poetry landscape, a poetry not recognised by the mainstream.

As Sinclair said in his introduction to Conductors of Chaos, ‘The work I value is that which seems most remote, alienated, fractured.’

Celebrate the work of these ‘elective outsiders’.

The Saison Poetry Library at Royal Festival Hall

Admission is free but space is limited. To book your place email specialedition@poetrylibrary.org.uk

Link to the event page: http://www.southbankcentre.co.uk/whatson/conductors-of-chaos-1000810

Of Film and Smoke: An Interview with Iain by Paul McRandle on Rain Taxi

Source: Of Film and Smoke: An Interview with Iain Sinclair | Rain Taxi

Black Apple of Gower, Little Toller Books – out in July 2015

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An enigmatic series of paintings by Ceri Richards, based on the theme of the ‘Black Apple of Gower’, is the provocation for Iain Sinclair’s return to the landscape of his childhood and youth. Best-known for his journeys through London or circumnavigations of the M25, here we find him digging into memory files to realise that a series of walks over the same ground, Port Eynon Point to Worm’s Head, become bookmarks for the significant stages in his life. Recollections of a meeting with the poet of place, Vernon Watkins, focus attention on legends of the rocks. And on the mythology of the eternal return: the dead and the drowned as unfulfilled witnesses.Through expeditions over cliffs and elemental wave-cut pavements, Sinclair comes to realise that the defining quest is for access to the Paviland Cave, where the reverend William Buckland ‘discovered’ the bones of the Red Lady. Who, as it turned out, was no lady but a young man put to ground 36,000 years ago – the first recorded ritual burial in these islands. All the threads of the story knot within this potent and still mysterious cavern.IAIN SINCLAIR176 x 128mm hardback184 pages printed on Munken papersJacket illustration by Jonny HannahIllustrated throughoutISBN 978-1-908213-28-0Published July 2015

Source: Black Apples | Little Toller Books